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people who do mathematics at university come here

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#1
Fliksty

so im in a bit of a predicament. i dont know whether to do maths with economics or maths with mathematical physics. i liked physics in my school but i feel like econ will have better job prospects

#2
PrTsty
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do computer science, ez gg

#3
Fliksty
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yea i did it in school but i found it boring

#35
Zaynio
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did you do java or c++? Although languages are really similar all together albeit syntax, were the puzzles and program creating really that boring?

#40
Stendo
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Not everyone like to write code.

#4
DDot
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really depends on what kind of career u want to pursue

#9
PrTsty
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Discord mod

#32
DDot
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university will only divert u from ur dream then

#5
Asphyxia
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Go for what u want. Either can have a decent career.

#23
KoreanOverlord
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lol this is the biggest cap

econ is basically a useless degree unless youre graduating from target with good gpa and internships

its basically a one way ticket to work as a lowly financial advisor at some bootleg firm

mathematics, compsci, or econ with double major in any of the two things I mentioned would set you up for a good career

#6
Glycoroldas
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Whatever kind of mathematics you do, you'll obtain transferable skills regardless. I know plenty of people who had done undergrad in Physics and ended up working for financial firms in London, just because everybody assumes that mathematics in physics is pretty heavy.

If it were my choice I would go for mathematical physics, just because it will look more impressive on the CV after you graduate. Moreover, you're most likely gonna end up doing an MSc regardless(unless you will have connections that can get you directly employed or you will be a creme de la creme first class undergrad student), and for the applications to those degrees the most important thing is gonna be a fact that you had done math to begin with.

#11
fontea
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Yeh every mech eng open day I went to they were like "and now 10 percent of our MENG graduates are now at top financial firms in the city"

#21
Fliksty
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yea im doing an integrated masters, 4 years

#25
Glycoroldas
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Okay, integrated masters is a bit of a predicament indeed tbh. If you will want to do a standalone MSc after you are done with your integrated masters degree, unfortunately student finance england is not gonna give you the loan to cover the tuition fees(unless something has changed since 2019).

Yeah, you better carefully choose now, because you won't be able to significantly alter your career specialisation through an integrated masters degree. You can still get some sort of specialisation through module choices, but not as significant as doing a separate MSc degree.

Moreover, there are still boomer employers who be like 'MSci is not the same as MSc tho' ;pppp

#26
Fliksty
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i have the option to choose Bsc in my 2nd year if im not feeling comfortable with it

#27
Glycoroldas
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fair enough, anyway best of luck with whatever you choose. I think in the end what matters is that you are doing math to begin with

#33
capemari
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Isn't standalone masters pretty much the same as the intergrated ones except that the ones that do standalone get to brush up their previous 3 years' topics in like 3 months? I'm saying this because I'm in my masters year (intergrated, M.Eng.) and M.Sc (standalone) students are also with me. Unless there are some specific course that are only offered as standalone Masters.

#37
Glycoroldas
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It depends on the University I think. From my personal experience, my MBiochem felt like an extended undergraduate degree in terms of content. I.e. For those MBiochem letters, I basically ended up doing more undergrad modules and the final year project was a bit longer and had stricter requirements. There was only one 20 credit integrated masters specific module too(data analysis basically), other optional modules were just basically third year BSc modules. Whereas, taught MSc degress had even more unique modules that were unavailable to undergrads, but at my institution MSc by research was a far more popular choice, so not many people were doing taught MSc in my department to begin with. But I graduated in 2019 and the department went through a significant module overhaul, basically eliminating all 10 credit modules and standardising everything to 20 credit modules, so a lot of things might have changed since I graduated

#38
capemari
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True, 10 credit modules are on the decline. Unis are moving to 15 or 20 credit modules for 2nd year and above. I share the same thought as you about the intergrated masters year. Basically treating it as part of bachelors because there are only couple of modules that are highly specialised. Nothing like doing a standalone masters where the course might itself be very specialised.

#7
hilo0829
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lol just do econ shits ez af dont do hard maths and regret ur life
ez life always wins

#8
PrTsty
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Its not easy af. He doesnt live in the US

#10
hilo0829
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arent u like 8

#13
PrTsty
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12*

#16
hilo0829
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are u defending urself or roasting urself

#17
PrTsty
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equal

#12
AcidRain
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yeah these british chewsday innit kids say NA education but NA has more succesful people than Europeans with a fraction of the population. Stay mad

#14
PrTsty
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USA was founded by europeans.
also that doesnt change the fact that NA education is trash besides the univesities where u have toi pay 500k a month to be able to study there

#15
Fliksty
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i literally just want some advice, id rather study in USA tbh. its like a whole different experience.

#18
Fliksty
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but i aint too smart for that + the tuition fees are kinda highhhhh and im probably working in the UK for the rest of my life which im privileged to have + a good spawn anyway so i wont complain

#19
PrTsty
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UK gives me depression

#20
KoreanOverlord
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Mathematics >>> econ in eyes of recruiter

#22
SharubuNguvu
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Maths has far greater job potential in finance, consulting and computer science. Econ is a more narrow degree and far more specified. Take maths only if you enjoy harder math, you can look up some videos what it will be like and if you are still interested I would pursue math.

#24
Fliksty
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the degree is like 90% maths and 10 % econ where you pick 1 module of econ in your 2nd year: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate/degrees/mathematics-economics-msci

#28
PrTsty
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How does computer science have less potential than math?

#29
SharubuNguvu
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you misunderstood me, math has greater job potential than econ in the three fields I listed because the degree is general enough that you can be hired for all three. With an econ degree it will be very hard to get a computer science job and depending on the type of consulting, a consulting job will be hard as well.

#31
PrTsty
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oh now i see, thanks for clarification

#30
yaiima0
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Why don’t you try looking into finance and see if you’re interested in that field.

#34
Blinded
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Economics has the best opportunities, I done econ at LSE and got on a grad scheme after my second year. Trust me bro econ is the way but depends on the uni homie.

#36
Zaynio
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Econ is a solid choice overall but math with physics will always have more potential for the average person because of 21st century tech and it requiring complex math (related to physics).

#39
Ulamoski
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MSc maths student here, read this thread a couple days ago and it somehow got stuck in the back of my mind so here's my 2 cents.

the MSci looks like a BSc student that postponed graduating for 1 year to do some extra courses, which is not necessarily bad, but i doubt it compares to the amount of specialisation a MSc student has at the end of their degree.

EZ route: If u want to get into finance or accounting u can look into a BSc in econ or business administration and a MSc in corporate finance or something similar.

Harder route: If u want to get into the more math-heavy side of finance, do a BSc in maths and look for a MSc in financial engineering or a MSc maths specializing in stochastics / differential equations.

Hardest route: If u want to get into mathematical physics really ur only option to be taken serious is by doing a Maths+Physics BSc followed by a MSc in either Maths or physics. No one in academics will look at a MSci student and consider them for a Phd position.

Other related options could be econometrics, or some business analytics/data science type of degree

Hope this helps, goodluck with ur decision! :)

#41
HackNaija
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whats the point anyway

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